4 out of 5. One of the most polished Mini-Metroidvania experiences you can find. Precise Platforming and one challenging boss fight is nicely wrapped up in this 30 to 60 minute adventure.
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How Metroidvania is it? Medium Fit. Heavier Platforming focus strays just slightly from the Metroid or Castlevania formula which makes me hesitate to call it a ''high fit.''
Primary Challenge: Tricky Platforming
Time to beat: ~1 hours
Review Info: The Steam review code for Tiny Dangerous Dungeons was provided by the Developer

More Info

Developer: Adventure Islands
Publisher: Adventure Islands
Sub-genre: Mini Metroidvania
Features: Map System, 2D Platformer, Tricky Platforming, Family Friendly
Difficulty: Medium
Linearity/Openness: High Gating - No Handholding
Platforms: Windows, Steam, Android, iOS
Release Date: 2019/05/01
Available Languages: English

Store Links
Note: The Web link below is to the browser-based Newgrounds version of the game

    Steam    Google Play Apps    Apple App Store    Website Link    

Buy Tiny Dangerous Dungeons if you like…

  • MIni-Metroidvanias
  • Precision platforming challenges
  • Precise ''One-Shot One-Kill'' aiming
  • Well-hidden secrets
  • Gameboy Era Aesthetic

▼ Review continues below ▼

Tiny Dangerous Dungeons is an excellent and polished Mini-Metroidvania that will probably take you less than an hour to complete. In a world where Steam has 30,000 games and many of them are demanding so much of your time on an individual basis, I find these shorter experiences to be a refreshing change of pace. Mini-Metroidvanias are like a sample of the Metroidvania genre – giving you just a taste of what the genre has to offer without taking too much time away from Monster Hunter World, Sunset Overdrive, Clicker Heroes, or whatever else you prefer to spend your 100 hours on. Originally a free browser game, then a Mobile game, Tiny Dangerous Dungeons is finally on Steam to grace us with its flavor, and I think it’s a most welcome addition.

The primary focus in Tiny Dangerous Dungeons is providing a tight tricky platforming experience. You begin the game with only your ability to jump, and all other power-ups build upon this core gameplay of deftly landing between obstacles. By necessity the map has to be somewhat simple – you generally have only a couple of new options at a time in order to progress. This setup would become somewhat repetitive were the game any longer, but for the length this design allows the game to introduce new obstacles often enough to make each progression feel fresh and interesting. Each of these challenges culminates with a final boss fight that is simple enough to fit in with the game’s Gameboy theming, but difficult enough to warrant more exploration within the dungeon.

Exploration outside the critical path is rewarded with more HP for your character, which can help a lot with the difficulty of that final fight. Or, if you want a challenge, you can face him with the three hearts you start with. The game isn’t particularly hard in general, but the difficulty curve is really well done. The boss fight is something of an exception to the medium difficulty of the game – presenting a relatively big spike upwards in difficulty – but as mentioned you can always boost your HP through more exploration if you want some help. The map is small enough to make backtracking painless, and even better each of the game’s movement upgrades are designed to make you feel powerful when you return to areas and trivialize old challenges.

The controls are tight with both the jumping and your weapon rewarding accurate inputs. It is difficult for me to think of any real criticisms to levy against Tiny Dangerous Dungeons; in many ways it’s the most polished game I’ve played in the Mini-Metroidvania category. I’m sure that there are some that will be put off by its monochromatic presentation, but people will make their judgement on the graphics without my report. I think there could be a little more to the game’s story and theming, and of course more content would always be welcome assuming it’s as tightly designed. The name “Tiny Dangerous Dungeons” being plural made me think that I’d be playing multiple Mini-Metroidvanias in sequence, which, would be a great package. But, again those things have little to do with the design of the game itself. If you want just a spoonful of Metroidvania before you get back to whatever your 100+ hour vice is, Tiny Dangerous Dungeons is an excellent pick.


Final Score

4/5

Scoring system overview


Metroidvania Breakdown

Combat
– 3

More of a platforming focus, but there are some encounters that are designed well enough

Platforming
– 4

Some very good challenges to fill up its relatively short length. Escalates nicely as the game progresses

Exploration
– 4

There are four super hidden secrets that really help wih the game's final challenge - making exploration beyond the critical path rewarding

Puzzle
– 2

Not a focus beyond the typical Metroidvania puzzle platforming of ''How do I Apply my new power?''

Story
– 2

Not a focus. Dude goes into dungeon to get Treasure.

Graphics
– 3

Some may not like the monochrome aesthetic, but it suits the game well

Music
– 3

Music is a very nice imitation of the era of gaming this is trying to emulate

Replayability
– 2.5

Main game has little reason to come back to it, but the game does have a time trial mode that may be attractive to some


Want a second opinion? See what other reviews say:

Steam Reviews
All Time: Very Positive
(96% of 57 Reviews)


TBD Metacritic
Read critic reviews